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    ROHS

    ROHS

    What is RoHS?

    ROHS
    ROHS

    RoHS-Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment

    The Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment, or RoHS, is a regulation implemented by the European Union in 2003 to help reduce the amount of hazardous substances that are used in electronic equipment. Now, many electronics manufacturers have started to comply with RoHS, and it’s important for you as a consumer to be aware of the restrictions so that you can make informed buying decisions.

    What is RoHS-Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment

    RoHS-Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment is a regulation by European Union that took effect in 2006. The regulation restricts the use of hazardous substances in electronic and electrical equipment.

    What are RoHS products?

    RoHS stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment. RoHS is a European directive that came into effect in 2006. The purpose of RoHS is to help protect human health and the environment by restricting the use of hazardous materials in electronic products. What are the restrictions?
    RoHS restricts the use of six hazardous substances: lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, nickel, and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs). All six substances must be eliminated from electronic products by 2019. How do I know if my product is RoHS compliant?
    RoHS is not always visible on products. To check if your product is RoHS compliant, you can contact the manufacturer or search for the RoHS logo on the product label.

    What is RoHS Compliant?

    The Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) was introduced in 2003 as an EU Directive to reduce the release of hazardous substances into the environment. RoHS is now widely implemented in the electronics and electrical industries. All products that come into contact with electricity or electronic media must comply with RoHS if they are intended for sale in the European Union.
    This includes computer monitors, laptops, tablets, smartphones, and other digital devices. The directive applies to alloys, chemicals, plastics and materials used in electrical and electronic equipment.

    Some of the key requirements of RoHS include:
    – Products must not contain more than 0.1% of lead by weight
    – Products must not contain more than 0.5% of mercury by weight
    – Products must not contain more than 1% of cadmium by weight
    – Products must be able to clearly identify which substances are restricted

    Does RoHS mean lead free?

    As of July 1, 2006, all electronic equipment must be RoHS compliant. This law is designed to reduce the amount of lead and other hazardous substances that are used in electronic products.

    So does RoHS actually mean lead free? The answer is yes, but there are a few things you need to keep in mind.

    First, RoHS only applies to new products. Existing products that were made before July 1, 2006 are not required to be RoHS compliant.

    Second, RoHS does not necessarily mean that the product is Lead-Free. Many products that are labeled as being Lead-Free may still contain hazardous substances. It’s important to read the product label and check for specific information about the lead and hazardous substance levels.

    Finally, even if your product is not labeled as being Lead-Free, it still may meet the requirements of RoHS. Many hazardous substances can be eliminated through proper manufacturing and packaging techniques.

    Requirements of RoHS Certification

    Electronic products must meet the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) requirements in order to be sold in Europe. RoHS is a set of rules that manufacturers of electronic products must follow in order to reduce the amount of hazardous substances released into the environment.

    Products that are designated with the RoHS symbol have been tested and found to meet the restrictions. These products may release fewer hazardous substances during their life cycles, which can help protect human health and the environment.

    Procedure of RoHS Certification

    The Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) is a European Union directive that restricts the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. This directive came into effect on June 6, 2006.

    To comply with RoHS, manufacturers must ensure that no hazardous substances are present in their products in amounts above designated limits. The limits for each substance depend on the toxicity and potential environmental hazards of that substance.

    Manufacturers must also submit an RoHS declaration to the relevant authority in each EU member state. This declaration details the manufacturer’s compliance with RoHS and provides information on the products containing hazardous substances.

    To be certified as RoHS compliant, a product must meet all six requirements set out by the European Commission. These requirements are:
    1) The product must not contain any hazardous substances in concentrations above the designated limit.
    2) The product must not contain any other substances which may be harmful to human health or the environment when exposed to concentrations above the designated limit.
    3) The product must be free from any defects that could lead to its release of hazardous substances in concentrations above the designated limit.
    4) The materials used in the product 

    Who has to comply with RoHS?

    The regulation of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) came into effect in 2006. Almost all electronic devices produced after January 1, 2007 must comply with RoHS.

    The regulation restricts the use of hazardous materials in electrical and electronic equipment. This includes materials such as lead, mercury, cadmium, and polybrominated biphenyls. These materials can be poisonous if they are inhaled or ingested.

    Many electronic devices now have a sticker that says “Complies with RoHS”. This means that the device has been tested and meets the requirements of the regulation. If you have an electronic device that is not marked “Complies with RoHS”, you may need to take it to a certified recycler to have it recycled in accordance with RoHS guidelines.

    What is difference between RoHS and non RoHS?

    Non RoHS:

    The non-RoHS directive is a European Union regulation that restricts the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. It was introduced in 2002, with the aim of reducing the environmental impact of electronics. Devices that are placed on the market after 1 January 2006 must comply with the non-RoHS directive.
    RoHS:

    The RoHS directive is a European Union regulation that restricts the use of six hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. It was introduced in 2007, with the aim of reducing the environmental impact of electronics. Devices that are placed on the market before 1 July 2013 must comply with the RoHS directive. However, some devices that are placed on the market after this date may still be compliant if they have an approved feature to allow them to meet specific safety requirements.

    What are the benefits of being RoHS certified?

    RoHS certification stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment. It is a European Union directive that was created in 2002 and requires the use of safer materials in electronic products. RoHS compliance can lead to reductions in toxic waste, increased efficiency, and reduced environmental impact. In addition, RoHS certification can help improve product quality and extend the life of electronic equipment.

    If you need more support with RoHS Certification, please contact us at +91-8595603096 or support@pacificcert.com

    Suggusted Certifications –

    1. ISO 9001:2015
    2. ISO 14001:2015
    3. ISO 45001:2018
    4. ISO 22000:2018
    5. ISO 27001:2013