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    ISO 15686

    ISO 15686

    ISO-15686
    ISO 15686

    ISO 15686-Buildings and constructed assets


    The ISO 15686:2010 sets out requirements for the design, construction, installation and maintenance of buildings and constructed assets. It is an internationally recognised standard that helps to ensure the safety of people working in and around these structures.
    ISO 15686-1:2011 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 1: General principles and framework
    ISO 15686-1:2011 is the international standard for buildings and constructed assets. It provides guidance on how to plan for the service life of buildings and other constructed assets.
    The ISO 15686-1:2011 standard defines five general principles that should be followed when planning for the service life of a building or constructed asset. These principles are:
    Continuity of function
    Redundancy of functions and systems
    Integrity of the structure
    Maintenance ability
    Recyclability
    ISO 15686-2:2012 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 2: Service life prediction procedures
    Service life prediction is the process of estimating the time that a building or a constructed asset will be in service, taking into account all relevant factors. Service life prediction can be used to help identify when it is necessary to take corrective action to preserve the asset.
    There are a number of different factors that can influence the service life of a building or a constructed asset. These factors include:
    Structural integrity
    Operational loads and conditions
    Environmental conditions
    Design and construction deficiencies
    Inaccuracies in data or models
    Changes in customer requirements or usage patterns
    The service life of a building or a constructed asset can be estimated using a variety of methods. Some of the most common methods include:
    Predictive maintenance
    Life cycle costing
    Life cycle assessment
    Service management analysis
    ISO 15686-1:2012 provides guidance on how to perform service life prediction, and ISO 15686-2:2012 provides guidance on how to use service life prediction procedures to manage buildings and constructed assets.
    ISO 15686-3:2002 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 3: Performance audits and reviews
    Performance audits and reviews are an important part of maintaining the health, safety, and welfare of buildings and constructed assets. Performance audits should be carried out at least every 5 years and reviews every 2 years.
    The purpose of a performance audit is to identify any issues that may have occurred with the design, construction, or operation of a building or constructed asset. Issues that may be identified during a performance audit include safety concerns, defective materials or components, and inadequate maintenance.
    A review is conducted to determine how well the previous performance audit has been implemented and to determine whether any corrective actions are necessary. Reviews should also be conducted if there are any changes to the environment in which a building or constructed asset is operated or if new information becomes available that could affect the health, safety, or welfare of people using the building or constructed asset.
    ISO 15686-4:2014 Building Construction — Service Life Planning — Part 4: Service Life Planning using Building Information Modeling
    Building construction can involve a wide range of activities and systems, from the design and construction of the building itself to its continued operation. In order to ensure that these activities are carried out in a safe and efficient manner, it is essential to have a sound understanding of the service life of building components and systems.
    Service life planning (SLP) is an important part of this process. SLP involves identifying the expected service periods for individual building components and systems, as well as predicting any potential failures that may occur during those periods. By doing so, it is possible to take appropriate steps to prevent or mitigate any potential problems.
    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is an effective tool for carrying out SLP. BIM allows architects, engineers, and other professionals to view a building as a complete system, allowing them to identify all the components and how they interact with each other. This information can then be used to create accurate models of the building, which can be used for various purposes including service life planning.
    If you are involved in the design or construction of buildings or constructed assets, be sure to consider using BIM for SLP. It will help you ensure that your buildings are delivered safely and on time
    ISO 15686-5:2017 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 5: Life-cycle costing
    This blog post provides an overview of the life-cycle costing (LCFC) approach to service planning for buildings and constructed assets. ISO 15686-5:2017 is the latest edition of the internationally recognised standard on service life planning for buildings and constructed assets.
    The LCFC approach to service planning takes into account the full life cycle of a building or constructed asset, from design through to disposal. This includes the associated risks and costs of providing services over its lifetime, as well as estimating future demand for those services.
    The LCFC approach can help to improve decision making by providing a transparent framework for assessing the costs and benefits of various service options. It can also help to identify potential savings opportunities, thereby improving long-term financial sustainability.
    For more information on how the LCFC approach can be used in practice, please visit our website or contact us.
    ISO 15686-6:2004 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 6: Procedures for considering environmental impacts
    When it comes to buildings and constructed assets, it is important to consider the environmental impacts that may be caused by their service life. This is especially important when planning for the future of these assets.
    In this blog post, we will discuss some of the procedures that you can use to assess the environmental impacts of a building or constructed asset. We will also discuss how you can take into account those impacts when making decisions about the future of that asset.
    We hope this information will help you to make informed decisions about the future of your buildings and constructed assets.
    ISO 15686-7:2017 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 7: Performance evaluation for feedback of service life data from practice
    This blog post is about how to evaluate the performance of buildings and constructed assets so that they can be feed backed with service life data.
    In order to provide good service life data, it is important that the performance of buildings and constructed assets is evaluated regularly. This can be done using a variety of methods, such as performance assessment or performance monitoring.
    The evaluation should cover all aspects of the building or asset, including its structural components, systems and services. The evaluation should also take into account any changes that may have occurred over the course of the building’s service life.
    The results of the evaluation should be used to improve the design, construction and operation of buildings and constructed assets.
    ISO 15686-8:2008 Buildings and constructed assets — Service-life planning — Part 8: Reference service life and service-life estimation
    There is a growing trend of buildings and constructed assets that are designed to last for a long time. This is in part due to the fact that they are subjected to stricter safety and environmental standards.
    As a result, it is important to have a plan for how the building or constructed asset will be used and how often it will need to be serviced. This can help to ensure that the service life of the building or constructed asset is consistent with its expected lifespan.
    There are three main steps involved in service-life planning: reference service life, service-life estimation, and corrective action. Reference service life is the estimated life of a building or constructed asset based on historical data and assumptions about how the building or constructed asset will be used. Service-life estimation is the process of estimating how long a building or constructed asset will last based on current usage patterns and future technological changes. Corrective action refers to taking actions (such as repairs) to extend the life of a building or constructed asset beyond its reference service life.
    To ensure that your buildings and constructed assets are properly serviced, use ISO 15686-8:2008 as your guide. This standard provides detailed information about how buildings and constructed assets should be
    ISO/TS 15686-9:2008 Buildings and constructed assets — Service-life planning — Part 9: Guidance on assessment of service-life data
    This part of ISO 15686-9 provides guidance on the assessment of service-life data for buildings and constructed assets. The guidance is based on experience and best practice, and is intended to help decision makers make informed decisions about when to take action to extend the service life of a building or constructed asset.
    Part 9 covers the following topics:
    1) Assessment of service-life data
    2) Service-life extension planning
    3) Strategies for extending the service life of a building or constructed asset
    4) Considering environmental conditions
    5) Maintenance and renovation planning
    ISO 15686-10:2010 Buildings and constructed assets — Service life planning — Part 10: When to assess functional performance
    Functional performance assessment (FPA) is a process used to identify and assess any adverse effects that may result from impairment of the service life of a building or constructed asset.
    The purpose of FPA is to protect the public, workers, and the environment by ensuring that buildings and constructed assets are maintained in a condition that does not adversely affect their safety, efficiency, or usability.
    There are various factors that should be considered when conducting an FPA, including:
    – The age, type, and condition of the building or constructed asset
    – The intended use of the building or constructed asset
    – The environmental conditions under which the building or constructed asset will be used
    – Changes in environmental conditions over time
    When conducting an FPA, it is important to take into account all relevant factors. This will help to ensure that the building or constructed asset remains in a condition that meets all required safety standards.

    If you need more support with any part of ISO 15686, please contact us at +91-8595603096 or support@pacificcert.com